Seederdoodles

Some people have a signature scent; others have a signature cookie. This is mine.

Seederdoodle

This bikkie, with nutritious ingredients, is a healthy play on a snickerdoodle. It’s simple and a crowd pleaser.
Makes about 20

Ingredients
2 c. sunflower seed flour
1/2 c. tapioca starch
1/8 tsp salt
1/4 tsp salt
2 tsp cinnamon, divided
1/4 c. coconut oil, softened (not melted)
4 TBSP maple syrup or honey
3 TBSP coconut sugar 

Method
Preheat oven to 170 fanbake. Prepare two baking trays with a silicone mat or baking paper.
In a food processor, whiz together sunflower and tapioca flours, salt, soda and 1 tsp of cinnamon until fully mixed. Then whiz in oil and sweetener until a soft “dough” forms. (It won’t feel like a traditional dough but don’t worry, it’ll work.)
Grab dough by tablespoons and roll into balls. 
Mix together the coconut sugar and remaining tsp of cinnamon in a small bowl. Get another small bowl of water. Dip the ball into water, then coat in the cinnamon-sugar mix. Place on the baking tray and repeat with all the balls. With a glass, wetted at the bottom, gently smash down each biscuit a little bit—just into a disc shape, not completely flat.
Bake for 10 minutes, then cool on the baking tray. 

Notes:

Read more about sunflower seeds. To make them into flour, simply grind in a food processor until a fine powder (don’t go too far or you’ll get sunflower butter).

Tapioca starch is available at Bin Inn or at groceries stores, labeled as Arrowroot Powder.

Store them in an air-tight container (I’ve never been able to keep them for more than a week, so who knows how long they last!). You can also make the dough and roll it into balls, then freeze. When you want to bake them, defrost for a few hours (or overnight) in the fridge, then continue from the dipping-into-water-and-cinnamon step. Cinnamon loses its potency when you freeze it, so it’s best not to bake and freeze them.